Liffey Odyssey 2017

Date:                  Sunday 28th May

Start Time:         12.00

Duration:           2 – 3 hours

Registration:     €10

The Liffey Odyssey is a leisurely 8 kilometre Canoe journey on the River Liffey through the heart of Dublin from Island Bridge to the East Link Bridge. It is being run as a fundraiser for CMRF – Crumlin (Crumlin Children’s Hospital) and proudly supported by I-Canoe and Dublin Port Company.    This event is open to the general public – however all participants must satisfy the organisers they have sufficient ability to participate. Open Canoes are the preferred craft however it is open to other craft that use a paddle such as Kayaks, Sit-on-Tops, Stand –Up- Paddle Boards and Rafts. It is primarily intended to be a fun day out to raise much needed funds for Crumlin Children’s Hospital.

Fancy Dress is strongly encouraged
Further details will be posted on Liffey Odyssey Facebook page

https://www.facebook.com/liffeyodyssey/?fref=ts

Press Release – Water users asked to take measures to prevent spread of Crayfish plague on River Suir

Department of Arts, Heritage, Regional, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs press release issued: Thursday, 18th May 2017

Water users urged to take precautions to limit an outbreak of Crayfish Plague on River Suirdownstream of Clonmel to Carrick-on-Suir.

 

All water users are being urged to take precautions after confirmation of an outbreak of Crayfish Plague on a stretch of the River Suir downstream of Clonmel to Carrick-on-Suir. It comes after large numbers of dead freshwater crayfish were reported on the river earlier this month. DNA analysis has now confirmed that the cause of death was crayfish plague.

The kill has only impacted White-clawed Crayfish and other freshwater animals are not affected. This is a characteristic feature of the disease which only infects species of crayfish but causes 100% mortality. All agencies including the National Parks and Wildlife Service, Inland Fisheries Ireland and Tipperary County Council will be working to contain the outbreak to this stretch of the River Suir. Given the experience of outbreaks elsewhere, a total kill of the population is expected which will have major consequences for the ecology of the river. Crayfish are very common in the Suir and are important in maintaining its ecology.

Protected White-clawed crayfish (D. Gerke)
Dead White-clawed crayfish in the River Suir (B. Nelson)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anyone using the river is being urged to observe the ‘Check, Clean and Dry’ protocol once they leave the river and before using it again. This means that all wet gear (boats, clothing and equipment) should be checked for any silt or mud, plant material or animals before being cleaned and finally dried. Disinfectant or hot water (over 40 degrees Celsius) should be used to clean all equipment and this should be followed by a 24 hour drying period.

 

The drying period is especially important in ensuring that all equipment is clear of infectious organism, including the removal of any water inside the boat. The crayfish plague organism can be carried on wet equipment to new sites and containment of the outbreak is essential to prevent spread to other unaffected populations in Ireland.

 

This is the second confirmed outbreak of the disease in Ireland following one in County Cavan in 2015. There is no indication of how the disease reached the Suir although a link to the Cavan outbreak is considered unlikely as the disease there appears to have run its course. This outbreak on the River Suir is of great concern as the stretch of river affected is popular with anglers and canoeists.

The White-clawed Crayfish is a globally threatened species and Ireland holds one of the largest surviving population. It is the only freshwater crayfish species found in Ireland and is present in lakes, rivers and streams over much of the island. Throughout its European range, this species has been decimated by the impact of Crayfish Plague which spread to Europe with the introduction of North American species of crayfish. Until 2015, Ireland was considered free of the disease and it remains the only European country without any established non-native crayfish species.

If Crayfish Plague becomes established there is a high probability that the White-clawed

Crayfish, which is currently protected under Irish Law and the EU Habitats Directive, will be eliminated from much of Ireland. If non-native crayfish are found to be established in Ireland, this could have a severe impact on habitats as they can destabilise canal and river banks by burrowing. It could also impact other freshwater species, such as salmon and trout fisheries. At this time however, there is no evidence that non-native freshwater crayfish have been introduced in this country.

The public are asked to follow the ‘Check, Clean and Dry’ protocol when using the river and to alert the authorities of any mass mortality of crayfish as well as sightings of unusual crayfish (e.g. red claws, large size).  by emailing Colette O’Flynn (coflynn@biodiversityireland.ie)  at the National Biodiversity Data Centre, Waterford.

For further media information:

Brian Nelson – T: 087 967 9937; E: brian.nelson@ahg.gov.ie

Ciaran O’Keeffe T: 087 2646416) E:  ciaran.okeeffe@ahg.gov.ie

Notes to Editors:

  • Anyone who sees any dead or dying crayfish should report this to National Parks and Wildlife Service, Inland Fisheries Ireland, Tipperary County Council or Colette O’Flynn at the National Biodiversity Data Centre, Waterford (email: coflynn@biodiversityireland.ie)
  • Members of the public who suspect they have seen a non-native species of crayfish are asked to take a picture of it showing the underside of the claws and submit this through this web page http://records.biodiversityireland.ie/record/invasivesor direct to Colette O’Flynn (email: coflynn@biodiversityireland.ie) Phone: 051 306248
  • White-clawed Crayfish Austropotamobius pallipes: This occurs throughout Ireland mainly but not exclusively in areas of limestone geology. It lives in a very broad range of freshwater from tiny streams and ditches to many small, medium and large lakes. The species is a generalist feeder and it in turn is a significant prey item of the Otter.
  • Crayfish Plague is caused by a fungus-like organism Aphanomyces astaci which is of North American origin but now occurs throughout Europe. The Crayfish Plague organism (technically an Oomycete and often called water moulds) normally grows on the outer shell of crayfish and as North American crayfish are generally immune to it, as they can prevent any infection reaching their body tissues. However, when the water mould infects White-clawed and other European crayfish, it rapidly, and fatally, spreads into the body tissues. Infected animals become distressed and behave abnormally and may survive several weeks before dying.
  • Non-indigenous Crayfish: These are any species which are not native to the country. Many crayfish species have been moved within Europe and into Europe from North America and Australia. The most significant of these is the North American Signal Crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus which is one of the main carriers of Crayfish Plague. This species is much larger than the White-clawed Crayfish and with distinctive red coloration on the underside of the claws.

Notice of appointment as Interim CEO

Canoeing Ireland is delighted to announce the appointment by the Board, of Paddy Boyd, as Interim CEO. Nominated by Sport Ireland for the position, Paddy was CEO of Irish Sailing for 16 years up to 2004 and served as Executive Director of Sail Canada for six and a half years until his return to Ireland last year. He has had an accomplished career in top sport management positions and we look forward to availing of his expertise to guide and lead our sport towards a successful and sustainable future.

Credit: www.afloat.ie

TDU AGM – 6th May – UL Limerick

Notice is given for the the training and development unit agm for the 6th of may in the university of limerick. This will be run in conjunction with a rolling cpd.

Motions and nominations need to be in by the 22nd of April to tdu@canoe.ie motions and nominations need to be proposed and seconded by current tdu members.

Regards

Kieran Mckevitt

Secretary training and development unit

Clonmel Slalom course – water gauge

Details on the levels for the Clonmel Slalom course

0.7 as the optimum height for the course.

0.8-0.9 gives a punchier wave on the weir and fatter eddies for teaching the top end of level 3 skills.

Above 0.9 the course starts to flush out and you get a decent flow of water going down the course.

Clonmel River Guage

Canoeing Ireland Training Centre Staff Panel 2017

Canoeing Ireland Training Centre are looking for fun, enthusiastic and eager instructors to work  over the summer months in Strawberry Beds, Chapelizod.

We will be running courses from Summer camps to Adult skills so plenty of opportunity to work, log hours and gain valuable experience.

Any queries on these positions can be forwarded on to training@canoe.ie.

If you would like to be put on the panel for work for the 2017 season, please click on the link below:

https://goo.gl/forms/7dTF02L7JbYVBn3F2

Please forward this on to  anyone from the greater Dublin area who you think would be interested in the work.

 

Canoeing Ireland,

016251105