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Blueway-Registration-Criteria

Registration Criteria

Registration to be a provider of the Canoeing Ireland Blueway provider scheme is open to all individuals, clubs, businesses and social, community, educational or commercial organisations offering canoeing activity in a commercial or not for profit context and who meet the Canoeing Ireland provider requirements.

For each provider registration application Canoeing Ireland will carry a desk-based instructor qualifications, insurance, standard operating procedures and risk assessments, equipment, tax compliance as detailed below. All Canoeing Ireland Blueway providers must be approved by the Board of Canoeing Ireland. No provider may take part in any events or training until registration has been completed and CI board approval received.

Staffing Qualifications

Registered providers must provide a list of their primary/core Canoeing Ireland qualified instructors. All instructors must be listed including ad-hoc and freelance instructors.

Registered providers can only use instructors who hold the qualifications relevant to the environment and courses they are delivering. Instructors may only operate within their remit and Canoeing Ireland pupil instructor ratios apply at all times.

All instructors must be current members of Canoeing Ireland and have completed Canoeing Ireland Garda Vetting.

Registered providers must provide copies of up to date first aid certificates for all instructors which will be recorded on the CI database.

Insurance

Registered providers must provide a copy of their insurance certificate and details of their conditions of cover and operating environment.

Equipment

Registered providers must provide a summary list of their equipment, including brands and models. The list must be supported with photographs of the equipment in bulk, e.g. photo of areas of the stores where equipment is kept, or photos of the equipment in use by groups.

Equipment must be fit for purpose and carry the required CE approval.

Standard Operating Procedures, Risk Assessments and Child Protection

Registered providers must provide copies of their standard operating procedures, risk assessments and proof of compliance with Child protection guidelines.

Tax Clearance

Where applicable registered providers must provide a valid tax clearance certificate.

Compliance

Canoeing Ireland reserves the rights to carry onsite inspection of program delivery without notice.

Reminder – Canoe Slalom AGM this Saturday January 27th

The AGM of Irish Canoe Slalom will take place at

6pm on Saturday the 27th of January

at the Canoeing Ireland Training Centre in the Strawberry Beds, Dublin.

  All AGM related documents can be found on our Documents page
            http://canoe.ie/slalom/sllalom-documents/

Tragic loss of life in Ecuador

Canoeing Ireland are deeply saddened by the deaths of the two Irish paddlers, Alex McGourty and David Higgins, while in Ecuador. Their family and friends have our deepest sympathies and our sincere condolences. Their loss will be felt by the whole community. We extend our condolences to all four of the other paddlers from the expedition. US national, Jeremy Bisson, was found on Saturday while Ecuadorian kayaker, Joaquin Meneses, was rescued two days later on Monday. They are still actively searching for Adam Vaughen.

Tribute to Alex McGourty and David Higgins – The Irish Times

David Higgins Tribute – Independent

David Higgins Tribute – Morning Live

Alex McGourty Tribute – The Times

Alex McGourty Tribute – Irish News

U23 & Junior World Championships C1 Semi Finals and Liam Jegou heading into finals this afternoon!!!

Jun/U23 Slalom World Championships – C1M Semi-Finals

This morning’s programme at the Jun/U23 Slalom World Championships in Bratislava, Slovakia saw the Irish team competing in the semi-finals of the C1M U23 and Junior classes.

Jake Cochrane was first-off, of the Irish U23 trio, on a very tight technical course. He lost a little time on gate 3, picking up a penalty in the process and shaved it a little tight on two following offset moves to pick up further touches on gates 8 and 13 to leave him in 23rd position overall of the 62 competitors in this class with a time of 107.55 plus six added penalties.

Robert Hendrick was next off and he put in a very controlled, penalty-free run of 109.06secs to finish up in 20th position overall.

Liam Jegou knew he had to put in a top ten performance to progress to this afternoon’s final and he put in a very solid, penalty-free run of 100.41secs to qualify in 7th position. So, one of our three U23 semi-finalists progress to the finals this afternoon.

In the C1M Junior class James Gibbons was next up and was going well and clear up to gate 14 but was off-line for the following very difficult offset sequence and missed gates 15 and 16. Despite going back for the gates, he lost at least 30secs and took 50’s on both which ended his challenge. Still a very good debut at this level of competition for this young paddler which he will be hoping to build on at next month’s European Championships.

All eyes now on Liam’s final run which is scheduled for 15.20 Irish time, with Liam 4th off of the 10 finalists. Follow him on:

https://www.canoeicf.com/canoe-slalom-world-championships/bratislava-2017

Crayfish Plague – Emergency Containment Measures – River Suir & River Deel

ATTENTION: CRAYFISH PLAGUE –EMERGENCY CONTAINMENT MEASURES

In response to a recent outbreak of Crayfish Plague in the River Suir and River Deel, emergency disease containment measures are needed to help prevent its spread.

Crayfish Plague is a disease that kills our native White-clawed Crayfish. All crayfish that become infected will die. Crayfish Plague is easily transmitted in water or via contaminated equipment (for example on canoes, waders or nets).

Ireland holds the largest population of the White-clawed Crayfish that remains in Europe.

HELP PROTECT OUR NATIVE CRAYFISH FROM THIS DISEASE

All water users are asked to operate a temporary ban on moving water sports and angling equipment out of the River Suir and the River Deel catchment – commencing immediately.

Water sports and angling equipment currently in use in the Suir catchment may continue to be used there; but boats or angling equipment should not be transferred out of the catchment.

Limit your activity to the river section where you normally operate, avoid moving around the catchment and follow biosecurity protocols – Check, Clean, Dry.

Source – Inter Agency response from National Parks and Wildlife Service, Inland Fisheries Ireland, Environmental Protection Agency, Limerick County Council, Cork County Council, Tipperary County Council, Tipperary Sports Partnership, Waterford City and County Council, Marine Institute, Local Authority Water and Communities Office, Waterways Ireland and National Biodiversity Data Centre

Press Release – Water users asked to take measures to prevent spread of Crayfish plague on River Suir

Department of Arts, Heritage, Regional, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs press release issued: Thursday, 18th May 2017

Water users urged to take precautions to limit an outbreak of Crayfish Plague on River Suirdownstream of Clonmel to Carrick-on-Suir.

 

All water users are being urged to take precautions after confirmation of an outbreak of Crayfish Plague on a stretch of the River Suir downstream of Clonmel to Carrick-on-Suir. It comes after large numbers of dead freshwater crayfish were reported on the river earlier this month. DNA analysis has now confirmed that the cause of death was crayfish plague.

The kill has only impacted White-clawed Crayfish and other freshwater animals are not affected. This is a characteristic feature of the disease which only infects species of crayfish but causes 100% mortality. All agencies including the National Parks and Wildlife Service, Inland Fisheries Ireland and Tipperary County Council will be working to contain the outbreak to this stretch of the River Suir. Given the experience of outbreaks elsewhere, a total kill of the population is expected which will have major consequences for the ecology of the river. Crayfish are very common in the Suir and are important in maintaining its ecology.

Protected White-clawed crayfish (D. Gerke)
Dead White-clawed crayfish in the River Suir (B. Nelson)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anyone using the river is being urged to observe the ‘Check, Clean and Dry’ protocol once they leave the river and before using it again. This means that all wet gear (boats, clothing and equipment) should be checked for any silt or mud, plant material or animals before being cleaned and finally dried. Disinfectant or hot water (over 40 degrees Celsius) should be used to clean all equipment and this should be followed by a 24 hour drying period.

 

The drying period is especially important in ensuring that all equipment is clear of infectious organism, including the removal of any water inside the boat. The crayfish plague organism can be carried on wet equipment to new sites and containment of the outbreak is essential to prevent spread to other unaffected populations in Ireland.

 

This is the second confirmed outbreak of the disease in Ireland following one in County Cavan in 2015. There is no indication of how the disease reached the Suir although a link to the Cavan outbreak is considered unlikely as the disease there appears to have run its course. This outbreak on the River Suir is of great concern as the stretch of river affected is popular with anglers and canoeists.

The White-clawed Crayfish is a globally threatened species and Ireland holds one of the largest surviving population. It is the only freshwater crayfish species found in Ireland and is present in lakes, rivers and streams over much of the island. Throughout its European range, this species has been decimated by the impact of Crayfish Plague which spread to Europe with the introduction of North American species of crayfish. Until 2015, Ireland was considered free of the disease and it remains the only European country without any established non-native crayfish species.

If Crayfish Plague becomes established there is a high probability that the White-clawed

Crayfish, which is currently protected under Irish Law and the EU Habitats Directive, will be eliminated from much of Ireland. If non-native crayfish are found to be established in Ireland, this could have a severe impact on habitats as they can destabilise canal and river banks by burrowing. It could also impact other freshwater species, such as salmon and trout fisheries. At this time however, there is no evidence that non-native freshwater crayfish have been introduced in this country.

The public are asked to follow the ‘Check, Clean and Dry’ protocol when using the river and to alert the authorities of any mass mortality of crayfish as well as sightings of unusual crayfish (e.g. red claws, large size).  by emailing Colette O’Flynn (coflynn@biodiversityireland.ie)  at the National Biodiversity Data Centre, Waterford.

For further media information:

Brian Nelson – T: 087 967 9937; E: brian.nelson@ahg.gov.ie

Ciaran O’Keeffe T: 087 2646416) E:  ciaran.okeeffe@ahg.gov.ie

Notes to Editors:

  • Anyone who sees any dead or dying crayfish should report this to National Parks and Wildlife Service, Inland Fisheries Ireland, Tipperary County Council or Colette O’Flynn at the National Biodiversity Data Centre, Waterford (email: coflynn@biodiversityireland.ie)
  • Members of the public who suspect they have seen a non-native species of crayfish are asked to take a picture of it showing the underside of the claws and submit this through this web page http://records.biodiversityireland.ie/record/invasivesor direct to Colette O’Flynn (email: coflynn@biodiversityireland.ie) Phone: 051 306248
  • White-clawed Crayfish Austropotamobius pallipes: This occurs throughout Ireland mainly but not exclusively in areas of limestone geology. It lives in a very broad range of freshwater from tiny streams and ditches to many small, medium and large lakes. The species is a generalist feeder and it in turn is a significant prey item of the Otter.
  • Crayfish Plague is caused by a fungus-like organism Aphanomyces astaci which is of North American origin but now occurs throughout Europe. The Crayfish Plague organism (technically an Oomycete and often called water moulds) normally grows on the outer shell of crayfish and as North American crayfish are generally immune to it, as they can prevent any infection reaching their body tissues. However, when the water mould infects White-clawed and other European crayfish, it rapidly, and fatally, spreads into the body tissues. Infected animals become distressed and behave abnormally and may survive several weeks before dying.
  • Non-indigenous Crayfish: These are any species which are not native to the country. Many crayfish species have been moved within Europe and into Europe from North America and Australia. The most significant of these is the North American Signal Crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus which is one of the main carriers of Crayfish Plague. This species is much larger than the White-clawed Crayfish and with distinctive red coloration on the underside of the claws.